Boo to the Business World

The big question this week seems to have been “so what have you seen at the film festival?” Sadly, I was preoccupied with inhaling darkroom chemicals this past weekend (read: WORKING IN THE DARKROOM. I’m

The big question this week seems to have been “so what have you seen at the film festival?” Sadly, I was preoccupied with inhaling darkroom chemicals this past weekend (read: WORKING IN THE DARKROOM. I’m not a huffer. Really, I’m not.) and working at Temple News during the week to make it out to any screenings, as much as I’d really like to. For those of you in similar situations, fear not. The 2002 Philadlphia Festival of World Cinema may have kicked off a week ago, but it’s only half finished, leaving plenty of great (or mildly interesting) films to be seen.

You just can’t go wrong with a title like Teenage Hooker Became Killing Machine In Daehakro. This Korean teen-angst flick has a B-movie premise if there ever was one (a high school prostitute is murdered by her teacher, but her corpse is revitalized into robot form so she can wreak revenge and havoc), but it sounds worthwhile for it’s surreal nature. A film summary cites punchy color contrast, loads of sex and violence (duh), and a score featuring Sun Ra and Massive Attack, as well as Korean punk rock. (International House, Friday, 11 p.m.)

The premiere screening of Emmett’s Mark should stir up plenty of hometown love. Not only was it shot in Philly, but it’s the feature length directorial debut by Doylestown native Keith Snyder. The offbeat cop drama centers on a young homicide detective who discovered he has a terminal disease. He strikes an arrangement with a mysterious stranger to have himself killed at a random time and place, sparing him the pain of the disease’s final stages. It then becomes his life’s work to see that the high-profile case he is assigned gets solved before his impending death (murder). Scott Wolf, Gabriel Byrne and Tim Roth star. (Prince Music Theater, Saturday, 8:15 p.m.)

Also of note this weekend is The Cartoons of Ub Iwerks. This collection of shorts from the guy who animated Steamboat Willie in the 1920s hones in on his own offshoot work from the ’30s. Some of it sounds, well, a little twisted (Pincushion Man’s descent upon Balloon Land, anyone?). Nevertheless, it should make for a delightful Sunday afternoon. (Prince Music Theater, Sunday, 12:15 p.m.)

For those of you too poor (or cheap) to take in any actual films, the festival offers plenty of free events as well. This weekend sees a “Chix On Flix” female filmmakers discussion going down, featuring Temple’s own Michelle Parkerson on the panel (1616 Locust St., Friday, 7 p.m.) and grand as well, casting agencies will be accepting headshots and resumes from those who hope to see themselves on screen someday. (1616 Locust St., Saturday, noon-3 p.m.)

In the other realms of visual arts, Temple’s 34th Annual Student Art Exhibition opens today and runs through the 25th in the ground floor gallery at the College of Engineering and Architecture (12th and Norris Sts., rooms 102 and 104). I think you should drag your collective selves over to this, not just because I happen to have a few hand-applied-silver-gelatin-on-canvas pieces on display, but because … well, you’ll get to see some of the best work your left-brained classmates are producing, from photography to painting to printmaking to architecture and design, all in one place! It’s on campus, and free no less! So git, dammit!


John Vettese can be reached at jvettbe@temple.edu

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